Friday, December 17, 2010

Google Reader Roundup

  • Anne Allen gives us How to Blog Part III - 14 mistakes to avoid. Note my one that I called out about not spamming your blog followers with email about anything whatsoever. It's completely unacceptable and if you do this, I will shut you out as fast as you can click "oops". This has happened to several bloggers recently and it's not okay.
  • Jessica Brooks again talked about how bloggers and tweeters and forum users have gone on about "helpful rejections" when in fact they are referring to standard form rejection letters that merely polite in tone. Helpful refers to specific advice to improve a manuscript, a rare thing. So Lydia Sharp posted one of these on her blog.
  • Carrie Heim Binas posts a thoughtful and eloquent post on failing better. I just Carrie for this. She's so...I'm very proud of her. She writes excellent posts, and her posts keep getting better. Carrie's blog is like the evolution of a great writer in real time.
  • Joe Moore at the Kill Zone has a holiday gift for us: some awesome suggestions on where to go for aspects of our books, including characters names, locations, bios, and statistics.

6 comments:

Linda G. said...

I've really come to rely upon your Google Reader Roundup. Thanks again for providing all these great links! :)

Teri Anne Stanley said...

Me, too! You are my resource of amazingness.

Roni Loren said...

Great roundup as always, thanks! :)

Mia Hayson said...

Thanks for the mention! I love that quote from Lewis Carroll. So true.

Jody Hedlund said...

Thank you for the shout out, Sierra! :-) Have a great weekend!

Anne R. Allen said...

Love your Friday round-up. Just enough links to get a few I missed, but not so many I feel overwhelmed.

Yes! Your comment on my blogpost was super-valuable. Along with not spamming other people's blogs, I should have said that goes double (maybe triple) for spamming other bloggers' email boxes. Don't listen to the "internet marketing gurus" who tell you to do this. Yes, you'll reach a lot of people. But only long enough to make them hate you. Being annoying is not good marketing practice no matter how many telemarketers have yet to figure it out.

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